rug

I’ve been using up all the weird bits of wool I’ve had lying around forever and am not realistically going to use for anything else. some of them are just small bits that are not big enough for much, others are a bit itchy or colours that don’t really go with anything else.

I used hdc stitch throughout and just increased ~8 stitches per round. normally, when trying to create a flat circle you’d increase 6 stitches per round in dc or 12 stitches per round in tr so hdc should probably be 9 stitches per round but it depends on how tightly you crochet. with this I had to be a bit flexible and do more or fewer increases as required because of the differing thicknesses of yarn. I crocheted with 3 different yarns held together and a 10mm hook. I used the smallest bits of yarn to start with and the largest at the end so that the stripes were not too wide or chaotic.

I worked in a spiral and used stitch markers to keep track of the increases but I changed the position of the increases every few rounds to keep the shape circular rather than faceted.

It’s big, and I haven’t weighed it but i think it’s very heavy!

It’s nice to sit on :)

roadkill

halloween_crochet_bunny_neschof

A fun and gruesome amigurumi crochet pattern for Halloween. Written using American crochet terms but only single crochet stitches are used so just substitute for dc if you’re used to reading English patterns. You will need:

  • brown and red yarn, around dk or worsted weight
  • a suitable sized hook
  • a yarn needle
  • buttons or beads or safety eyes or felt or whatever you’ve got
  • black and pink embroidery floss and a suitable needle

Head. In brown, crocheting into the back loop only of all stitches:

  1.  create a magic ring with 6sc
  2.  2sc in each stitch (12 stitches)
  3. *2sc, sc* repeat 6 times (18 stitches)
  4. *2sc, sc, sc* repeat 6 times (24 stitches)
  5. *2sc, sc, sc, sc* repeat 6 times (30 stitches)
  6. *2sc, sc, sc, sc, sc* repeat 6 times (36 stitches)
  7.  1sc in each stitch around (36 stitches)
  8.  1sc in each stitch around (36 stitches)
  9.  1sc in each stitch for half the round (18 stitches) then add red yarn and finish the round crocheting the two strands (red and brown) together, 1sc in each stitch (36 stitches total)
  10. *2sc, sc next 5 stitches* repeat 6 times (42 stitches)
  11. *2sc, sc next 6 stitches* repeat 6 times (48 stitches)
  12. drop the brown yarn and continue with just one strand of red *2sc, sc next 7 stitches* repeat 6 times (54 stitches)
  13. *2sc, sc next 8 stitches* repeat 6 times (60 stitches)
  14. *2sc, sc next 9 stitches* repeat 6 times (66 stitches)

underside of blood pool. In red, crocheting into the back loop only of all stitches:

  1.  create a magic ring with 6sc
  2.  2sc in each stitch (12 stitches)
  3. *2sc, sc* repeat 6 times (18 stitches)
  4. *2sc, sc, sc* repeat 6 times (24 stitches)
  5. *2sc, sc, sc, sc* repeat 6 times (30 stitches)
  6. *2sc, sc, sc, sc, sc* repeat 6 times (36 stitches)
  7. *2sc, sc next 5 stitches* repeat 6 times (42 stitches)
  8. *2sc, sc next 6 stitches* repeat 6 times (48 stitches)
  9. *2sc, sc next 7 stitches* repeat 6 times (54 stitches)
  10. *2sc, sc next 8 stitches* repeat 6 times (60 stitches)
  11. *2sc, sc next 9 stitches* repeat 6 times (66 stitches)

Ears. Make 2. In brown, crocheting into the back loop only of all stitches:

  1.  create a magic ring with 6sc
  2. *2sc, sc* repeat 3 times (9 stitches)
  3. *2sc, sc, sc* repeat 3 times (12 stitches)
  4.  1sc in each stitch around (12 stitches)

repeat round 4 until the ear measures ~7cm or any length you like the look of. Fasten off leaving a tail for sewing the ear onto the head. fold each ear in half at the base and pinch while sewing on to create the 3d ear shape.

roadkill_bunny_crochet (13)

Eyes. Use a safety eye or button or white felt for one “normal” eye and create the other as in my zombie phone case pattern – sew a patch of black embroidery floss to create a socket then knot up some pink floss with a white bead on the end. Sew through the socket and knot at the back.

roadkill_bunny_crochet (14)

stuff the head with scraps of yarn or fabric or toy stuffing and sew/crochet the head onto the blood pool base. You might want to also sew around closer to the brown head part to secure the blood flat. This can also be a good opportunity to introduce some messy blood patches – sew loosely with multiple threads to build up a messier finish.

roadkill_bunny_crochet (1)

Pay what you feel

If you liked this pattern and want to contribute to my wool stash so I can make bigger and better things then you can donate whatever amount you think this pattern is worth here. To donate more than £1 just increase the number of items 😉 Thank you!

£1.00

halloween_crochet_bunny_neschof

The version below was my first attempt at this idea, many years ago now. It was very free-form as I wanted a bumpy asymmetric transition from brown to red and an uneven shape of blood pool. I used red satin fabric for the underneath. I like this version the best but it’s difficult to write a coherent pattern for something that’s supposed to be messy and unplanned :)

˜Road-kill Rabbit


Copyright & Legal Stuff: I’m happy for you to sell items you make from this pattern but the images and words of the pattern itself are mine – I worked hard writing & testing & photographing so don’t copy or distribute any part of this pattern. If you’d like to share it then please link to this page. Thanks & happy crocheting


 

toadstool

seamless_toadstool_crochet_pattern_neschof

This pattern is for a seamless amigurumi mushroom or toadstool with a ribbed underneath to represent the gills. They are made in one piece, starting at the base of the stem and working upwards with instructions for two different shapes of top (one shown as a mushroom with a brown top and the other as a red toadstool here. The purple toadstool with the frilled stem is a slightly freestyle variation, explained at the end of the pattern). They’re all made in a single piece with sewing only needed for the white spots on the toadstool.

What you will need:

*Red, brown and cream or white yarn and a suitable sized hook (the red and brown photos show DK yarn with a 4mm hook making the finished toadstool ~10cm tall). Gauge is not important as the finished mushroom/toadstool will vary in size with type of yarn/size of hook and tightness of crocheting.

*Stuffing

*A stitch marker

*A yarn needle for sewing on the white toadstool spots

Techniques/stitches used:

Magic ring, slip stitch, single crochet, half double crochet, double crochet, changing colour. Pattern is written using american crochet terms.

Stem and ribbing – these steps are the same for the toadstool and mushroom. Use cream or white yarn and a suitable size hook for the type of yarn used. We will be working in a continuous spiral – use a stitch marker to keep track of rounds. Crochet into the back loop only of all stitches (this creates the dense amigurumi style surface with smaller holes than between normal stitches).

Round 1. Create a magic ring with 6sc and slip stitch closed.
Round 2. 2sc in each stitch (12 stitches total)
Round 3. *2sc, sc*  *repeat 6 times (18 stitches)
Round 4. *2sc, sc, sc*  *repeat 6 times (24 stitches)

Round 5-9. 1sc in each stitch
Round 10. *miss 1 stitch, sc the next 7 stitches*
*repeat 3 times (21 stitches)
Round 11. 1sc in each stitch
Round 12. *miss 1 stitch, sc the next 6 stitches*
*repeat 3 times (18 stitches)
Round 13. 1sc in each stitch
Round 14. *miss 1 stitch, sc the next 5 stitches*
*repeat 3 times (15 stitches)
Round 15. 1sc in each stitch
Round 16. *miss 1 stitch, sc the next 4 stitches*
*repeat 3 times (12 stitches)
Round 17. 1sc in each stitch

toadstool_stem3
Stuff firmly adding weight to the base if desired (you could use plastic pellets, lentils or rice wrapped in a scrap of fabric to stop them falling through the stitches.) However none of the toadstools shown in this pattern have weight added and they do stand up on their own with a little moulding of the base.
Do not fasten off but turn so the hole is towards you and continue on with the gills….

Gills – An impression of the gills seen on the underside of mushrooms is made by creating a ribbed circle. Work into the back loop only of all stitches (this is essential to create the ribbed effect as we work back and forth).
Step 1. Chain 8
Step 2. Chain 2, TURN, skip the 2 turning chains and crochet back down the rib: dc, dc, hdc, hdc, sc, sc, sl, sl.
Step 3. Slip stitch into the next sc of the stem top. TURN

toadstool_gills1
Step 4. Crochet back up the ribbing: sl, sl, sc, sc, hdc, hdc, dc, dc.
Repeat steps 2-4 all around the stem top until you slip stitch into the last sc of the stem top as shown in the photo below.


Step 5. Hold the two edges of ribbing together and slip stitch back up to the outer edge going through both sides as shown in the photo to complete the circle.

toadstool_gills_sewing
Do not fasten off but turn the work so the open end is facing you and continue on to the mushroom or toadstool top instructions….

Mushroom style top – We are now returning to working in rounds – change colour to brown and reattach your stitch marker. We are still working into the back loop only of all stitches (to create an amigurumi style dense surface).
Round 1. In brown sc all around the ribbing. 2sc into each treble and 2sc into each turning chain. This should equal 48 stitches for one complete round. (places to stitch are shown as red dots on the photo below but as long as you end up with the correct number and they are fairly evenly spaced then you don’t need to be exact)

start of top highlighting stitch locations

Round 2. *Miss 1 stitch, sc next 7 stitches.*    *repeat 6 times (42 stitches)
Round 3. *Miss 1 stitch, sc next 6 stitches.*    *repeat 6 times (36 stitches)
Round 4. 1sc in each stitch (36 stitches)
Round 5. *Miss 1 stitch, sc next 5 stitches.*    *repeat 6 times (30 stitches)
Round 6. 1sc in each stitch (30 stitches)
Round 7. *Miss 1 stitch, sc next 4 stitches.*    *repeat 6 times (24 stitches)
Round 8. 1sc in each stitch (24 stitches)

mushroom_top1
Round 9. *Miss 1 stitch, sc next 3 stitches.*    *repeat 6 times (18 stitches)
Add a small amount of stuffing to the centre only. (Try experimenting with different amounts of stuffing to give different shapes.)

mushroom_top2
Round 10. *Miss 1 stitch, sc next 2 stitches.*    *repeat 6 times (12 stitches)
Round 11. *Miss 1 stitch, slip stitch next stitch.*    *repeat 6 times (6 stitches)
Slip stitch into the 3rd stitch from the hook to close the hole, fasten off and weave in any loose ends.

mushroom1

Toadstool style top – We are now returning to working in rounds – change colour to red and reattach your stitch marker. We are still working into the back loop only of all stitches.
Round 1. In red sc all around the ribbing. 2sc into each treble and 2sc into each turning chain. This should equal 48 stitches for one complete round. (places to stitch are shown as red dots on the photo below but as long as you end up with the correct number and they are fairly evenly spaced then you don’t need to be exact)

start of top highlighting stitch locations
Round 2. 1sc in each stitch (48 stitches)

toadstool_top1
Round 3. *Miss 1 stitch, sc next 7 stitches.*    *repeat 6 times (42 stitches)
Round 4. 1sc in each stitch (42 stitches)
Round 5. *Miss 1 stitch, sc next 6 stitches.*    *repeat 6 times (36 stitches)
Round 6. 1sc in each stitch (36 stitches)

toadstool_top2
Round 7. *Miss 1 stitch, sc next 5 stitches.*    *repeat 6 times (30 stitches)
Round 8. 1sc in each stitch (30 stitches)
Round 9. *Miss 1 stitch, sc next 4 stitches.*    *repeat 6 times (24 stitches)
Round 10. 1sc in each stitch (24 stitches)
Round 11. *Miss 1 stitch, sc next 3 stitches.*    *repeat 6 times (18 stitches)
Stuff, but not overly – the top should be pushed down over the stem to create a bell shape. Different amounts of stuffing will create different effects. Experiment!

toadstool_top3
Round 12. *Miss 1 stitch, dc next 2 stitches.*    *repeat 6 times (12 stitches)
Round 13. *Miss 1 stitch, slip stitch next stitch.*    *repeat 6 times (6 stitches)
Slip stitch into the 3rd stitch from the hook to close the hole, fasten off and weave in any loose ends.

toadstool2

Spots – use the same colour yarn as the stem
Small spot:
Create a magic ring with 6sc, slip stitch closed, slip stitch the next stitch and fasten off leaving a tail long enough for sewing on.

toadstool_spots
Large spot:
Round 1. Create a magic ring with 6sc, slip stitch closed.
Round 2. 2sc into each stitch (12 stitches)
Slip stitch the next 2 stitches and fasten off leaving a tail long enough for sewing on.
Make 1 large and 2 small spots (or as many of each as you like) and sew on to the top of the toadstool.

toadstool1


Pay what you feel

If you liked this pattern and want to contribute to my wool stash so I can make bigger and better things then you can donate whatever amount you think this pattern is worth here. To donate more than £1 just increase the number of items 😉 Thank you!

£1.00



The large purple version of the toadstool was created following the pattern above  with modifications as follows:

The stem was created with two stands of yarn and a 5.5mm hook. One strand was cream with flecks of brown and the other white and slightly fluffy/textured. on rounds 6 and 8 of the stem 2 strands of the white textured yarn was used and sc stitches were alternated with puff stitches (yarn over, hook through next sc, pull loop through sc and onto hook x 3  (7 loops on hook), yarn over and pull through all loops). On round 11 I switched to two strands of the cream yarn. The gills were created exactly as written here using a single strand of the cream yarn and a 3.5mm hook. The top is two strands of slightly different and colour shifting shades of purple and made using the mushroom style top. This produces a large chunky and frilled stem with a smaller diameter top by comparison to the standard pattern. The junction between stem and top is very firmly stuffed so that it can be posed at a stable jaunty angle.

new_toadstool (8)


Copyright & Legal Stuff: I’m happy for you to sell items you make from this pattern but the images and words of the pattern itself are mine – I worked hard writing & testing & photographing so don’t copy or distribute any part of this pattern. If you’d like to share it then please link to this page. Thanks & happy crocheting


 

carrot

20180603_crochet_carrot (5)

you will need a very small amount of orange yarn and a few scraps of green yarn. You should use a hook one or two sizes smaller than that recommended for your orange yarn, this will make the stitches dense and compact.

The pattern is written in American terms but only slip stitches and single crochet stitches are used throughout. If you prefer English terms then just swap all the sc for dc and you’re good to go.

insert the hook into the loops on the right side of the piece (outside of the loop) only throughout.

20180603_crochet_carrot (8)

  1. ch 9, slip stitch into the first chain to form a loop
  2. 1sc each stitch (9 stitches)
  3. 1sc each stitch (9 stitches)
  4. skip first stitch, 1sc each stitch (8 stitches)
  5. 1sc each stitch (8 stitches)
  6. skip first stitch, 1sc each stitch (7 stitches)
  7. 1sc each stitch (7 stitches)
  8. skip first stitch, 1sc each stitch (6 stitches)
  9. skip first stitch, 1sc each stitch (5 stitches)
  10. skip first stitch, 1sc each stitch (4 stitches)
  11. skip first stitch, slip stitch the next three stitches, fasten off and cut, leaving a small tail

20180603_crochet_carrot (9)

optionally stuff the cut off ends into the top of the carrot to fill it out a little.

cut 3 lengths of green yarn ~4x longer than the carrot

20180603_crochet_carrot (10)

fold the green yarn in half and then half again as shown in the photo above. Insert hook through both layers of orange at the top of the carrot, toward one side, and pull through a loop of one of the green folded strands. pull the loose ends through and tighten

20180603_crochet_carrot (3)

repeat twice more with the other green strands, spacing evenly across the top of the carrot and then trim to a length you like

I added a pin to the back of mine to turn it into a brooch


Copyright & Legal Stuff: I’m happy for you to sell items you make from this pattern but the images and words are mine – I worked hard writing & testing & photographing so don’t copy or distribute any part of this pattern. If you want to share it then link to this page. Thanks & happy crocheting


 

 

Market Bag

crochet_market_bag_neschof

You will need two colours of dk/worsted/aran weight yarn and a 5mm hook. The two yarns should be approximately the same thickness. Here I needed ~35g of pink and ~45g of oatmeal yarn.

As you’re making this bag it may seem small and you might be tempted to increase some of the rounds or make the handle longer – I did exactly this during my first two trials of this pattern and they looked great before I put anything into them. This bag stretches a lot! You can find some photos at the end of this post showing this.

20180528_crochet_market_bag (9)

The pattern is written using American terms but the whole thing only uses double crochet stitches so switch this out for trebles if you prefer English terms.

Throughout the pattern the initial chain 3 counts as the first stitch of the round.

note that I’m left handed so the photos show the work from a left handed perspective – don’t worry if your work looks the mirror image of what you see here!

Start. using the first colour chain 4 and slip stitch into the first chain

Round 1. chain 3, 14 dc into the ring, slst into the top of the starting chain (15 stitches)

20180528_crochet_market_bag (4)

 

Round 2. chain 3, dc into same stitch, 2dc in each stitch around, slst into the top of the starting chain (30 stitches)

20180528_crochet_market_bag (5)

Round 3. chain 3, dc into same stitch, dc next stitch, *2dc, dc* repeat all around, slst into the top of the starting chain (45 stitches)

Round 4. chain 3, dc into same stitch, dc next 2 stitches, *2dc, dc, dc* repeat all around, slst into the top of the starting chain (60 stitches)

Round 5. chain 3, dc into same stitch, dc next 3 stitches, *2dc, dc, dc, dc* repeat all around, slst into the top of the starting chain (75 stitches)

Round 6. chain 3, dc into same stitch, dc next 4 stitches, *2dc, dc, dc, dc, dc* repeat all around, slst into the top of the starting chain (90 stitches)

note that in the next round we do not dc into the same stitch as the chain 3 at the beginning of the round. This is because we want to have an even number of stitches to begin the mesh pattern.

Round 7. chain 3, dc next 5 stitches, *2dc, dc, dc, dc, dc, dc* repeat all around, slst into the top of the starting chain (104 stitches)

20180528_crochet_market_bag (6)

Round 8. chain 4 (counts as dc + ch1), *skip 1 dc, dc, ch1* repeat all around, slst into top of the starting chain

20180528_crochet_market_bag (7)

Round 9. chain 4 (counts as dc + ch1), *dc into next dc, ch1* repeat all around, slst into top of the starting chain

Repeat round 9 twice more

20180528_crochet_market_bag (8)

change to second colour yarn. I like to use the Russian join technique as it gives a seamless transition and there are no ends to weave in. check out this craftsy tutorial if you’d like to give it a go

Repeat round 9 six times with the new colour yarn

20180528_crochet_market_bag (13)

Round 10. chain 3, 1dc in each dc all around, slst into top of the starting chain

20180531_crochet_market_bag (2)

Round 11. chain 3, 1dc in each dc all around, slst into top of the starting chain

Now we start to make the handle

Step 1. chain 3, 1dc in next 13 stitches (14 stitches)

Step 2. turn, chain 3, 1dc in next 12 stitches (13 stitches)

Step 3. turn, chain 3, 1dc in next 11 stitches (12 stitches)

Step 4. turn, chain 3, 1dc in next 10 stitches (11 stitches)

Step 5. turn, chain 3, 1dc in next 9 stitches (10 stitches)

Step 6. turn, chain 3, 1dc in next 8 stitches (9 stitches)

Step 7. turn, chain 3, 1dc in next 7 stitches (8 stitches)

20180531_crochet_market_bag (3)

Step 8. turn, chain 3, 1dc in each dc of the previous row (including the turning chain of the previous row) (8 stitches)

Repeat step 8 fourteen times

Step 9. turn, chain 3, dc into same stitch and each stitch across (including the turning chain of the previous row) (9 stitches)

Repeat step 9 until you again have 14 stitches in the row

20180531_crochet_market_bag (4)

lay out the bag and line up the unattached handle with the centre of the opposite edge. Either crochet slip stitch or fasten off and sew onto the rim

and finished!

crochet_market_bag_neschof


Copyright & Legal Stuff: I’m happy for you to sell items you make from this pattern but the images and words are mine – I worked hard writing & testing & photographing so don’t copy or distribute any part of this pattern. If you want to share it then link to this page. Thanks & happy crocheting


At the beginning of this post I mentioned that the bag may seem small but it stretches a huge amount. The first bag I made to this pattern had more rows and a longer handle. It looked perfect when it was empty but here’s what happened when I put a few heavy items inside:

it’s not terrible but it’s also not the most comfortable bag to carry back from the shops.

Here are equivalent photos of the smaller bag:

shiny crochet sardine

IMG_20180429_180004

This little guy has been swimming around in my head for a while now.

Today he finally got out.

I always thought pilchards and sardines were different fish. Actually, I never thought that before today. This is the first time I ever contemplated pilchards. But I wanted to know what to call this post so i looked them up. It seems to depend where in the world you are but generally pilchards are longer than 15cm long so this is a sardine :)

IMG_20180429_175825IMG_20180429_180004

honeycomb cowl

IMG_20180421_112009_691

I’m almost always wearing a scarf. I like to be warm and having a warm neck somehow filters down through the rest of me. A cowl is just a tube you wear around your neck for the same reason you would wear a scarf. It can be short and close fitting (a neck warmer), looser and long enough to pull up over your head (a snood) or even wide enough to wear around your shoulders. I prefer the close-fitting neck warmer variety but might be tempted to make a snood one day.

This cowl is Tunisian crochet, honeycomb stitch in the round, using a dk weight colour changing yarn in the forward direction and a chunky solid purple yarn for the return direction. I used a 9mm double ended crochet hook and started with a chain of 59 but you might need to adjust for your own tension, yarn and requirements. You need an odd number of stitches for the honeycomb pattern but you can count up and adjust by one after the first round if needed. These instructions assume you’re already familiar with Tunisian crochet in the round – if not, then there are loads of great tutorials on you tube and other places to get you started – you probably don’t want to make this stitch your first experience with Tunisian crochet :)

IMG_20180420_090742_975

  1. using a 9mm double ended hook, chain 59 using the dk yarn
  2. straighten out the length of chains and slip stitch into the first chain
  3. for the first round take the bump thread on the back of the chain (makes a nice finished edge) onto the hook and complete the reverse stitches as normal with the chunky yarn
  4. once the first round is complete alternate on each forward stitch between Tunisian simple stitch (TSS) and Tunisian purl stitch (TPS). complete the return as normal
  5. just keep going around until the piece measures ~20cm. From the second round, each TSS should be going into a purl stitch in the round below (looks knotted and twisted) and each TPS should be going into a simple stitch in the round below (looks open and straight)
  6. fasten off the chunky return yarn and complete one round of regular sc in the thinner dk yarn to give a nice finished edge that mirrors the first round
  7. fasten off and weave in ends

I used this video by Tuula Maaria to learn the honeycomb stitch so check that out if you find watching easier than reading.

Here is the finished cowl:

IMG_20180421_105455

and inside out:

IMG_20180421_105434

IMG_20180421_112009_691

urban sketching gloves

urban sketching gloves

while my crochet fingerless gloves keep my hands warm, my fingers are left exposed and quickly freeze. I found these white fluffy gloves for 50p recently and hacked off the thumb and index fingertips of the left hand in attempt to keep in more of the heat.

As soon as I shake this cold I’ll be able to head out and give them a test run!

odds and ends hat

odds_hat

I have a big glass bowl full of small bundles of yarn. they’re the ends of balls or the result of an unravelled project. Not small enough to just discard and throw away but not really big enough to use for anything. This weekend I gathered them all up and turned them into this colourful hat. I reasoned that if you add in enough colours then go all the way past clashing and gaudy through to harmony and cohesion again. I wasn’t wrong. Love this hat.

To get the colour harmony going I held two contrasting colour strands together and used a big hook. Then when one colour ran out I just tied on another colour and pushed the knot to the back. The colours run out at different times so you get constant overlap and blending and it all just looks like it’s meant to be.

IMG_20171218_130548

Lost in Time

 

Yesterday it had snowed overnight and was still snowing so I spent the day crocheting. First of all the best part of every project – picking the pattern and the wool!

Lost in time is the name of a free crochet shawl pattern by Mijo Crochet

It’s very beautiful – bobbly and ripply and tassely :)

IMG_20171210_131224_01.jpg

Then I was off – very quick rows to start with – always quick rows to start with – sucks you in – makes you think it will be a breeze – be finished in a day – I’ll be wearing it tomorrow!

IMG_20171210_150923_01.jpg

But no, of course, each row takes just that bit longer than the last so that eventually you don’t even have time between ordering a takeaway and it arriving to complete a single row! Oh woe is me – this will take forever – I’ll finish it just in time for summer when it will be too hot to wear! – maybe tiny crocheted triangles are fashionable just now? no? they just look silly, like woolly hankies? Oh, ok, i’ll keep on with the rows then…

So goes the cycle of every single triangle crochet project. and I never remember the next time. It’s ok though, it all works out in the end.

This is where I got up to yesterday. The real danger is to be tempted away to another shiny project before this is complete.

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IMG_20171211_104218.jpg

 

falling snow crochet hat

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I’ve been meaning to make a puff stitch hat for a while now and this week finally got around to it. I bought this glittery silver/grey wool last Christmas and it was perfect for this two colour hat. It’s much shinier than it comes out in the photos. The closeup below shows it better.

IMG_20171021_144054

With the gradual colour change I think it is wonderfully reminiscent of falling snow. Plus the turquoise is a good icy colour.

hat1

There is enough silver wool left for a second hat and I’m thinking of switching the sliver to the bottom (fallen snow) with a darker colour on top to play the part of a night winter sky.

 

It was trickier to make than I expected (I didn’t find any patterns I liked so just made it up as I went along) The band, colour change and gathering at the top were the main areas I had to rework as I’ve not used puff stitch much before. It was perfect for this colour change effect though once I realised how to adjust it.

Oh, and if you really want it but don’t want to make one then I’ve put this one up for sale in my Etsy shop (since I’m already planning the next one. I have so many hats…)

glittery shrug & fox dress

Another long term crochet project finally finished. The pattern is called the glittery shrug from Lion Brand crochet (free download via the link). I’m not sure why it’s called glittery because it’s not. It is nice though – quite cosy. It’s taken me over a year to complete but that’s my flittering attention span rather than the complexity of the pattern. I did have to unravel a few bits and do them again but it was generally ok.

 

Granny Square Cardigan

granny_square_cardigan (4)

I was slowly adding rounds to my little granny square and then I saw this child-size shrug made from a granny square by Lulu Loves and I knew I wanted to turn it into that. But big enough to fit me. Which turned out to be much bigger than the square I had. Round and round some more I went. *sigh* still far too small. Round and round and round.

granny_square_cardigan (8)

Eventually I decided it would do and I would improvise so I experimented with folding the square at different points (the one in the link is folded in half but mine would have to be maybe double the size to make that work) and settled for just over a third as below:

granny_square_cardigan (7)

I then sewed a little way up either side to make arm holes and a basic vest type thing:

granny_square_cardigan (6)

I then went round and round in red to make it a bit bigger and in this way it ended up quite fitted and more cardigan than shrug.

granny_square_cardigan (5)

Which could be good. It’s just a little different to how I imagined. What I imagined was a big, baggy, cosy shrug, almost to my knees at the back, but that would have taken me forever to crochet so better that I have something now than a still unfinished project in three years time. Plus, if I’d actually been aiming at a fitted top then I’d be very pleased as it’s quite comfy and fits well. I’m just not sure what the style of this is now. It doesn’t really go with the clothes I imagined wearing it with.

granny_square_cardigan (4)

granny_square_cardigan (3)

granny_square_cardigan (2)

Fish & chips brooch

Friday is fish and chip supper night!

fish-and-chip-crochet-brooch-5

This was inspired by the “peas” on my pizza slice brooch. Also I was itching to make something with silver thread. My favourite part though is the little final touch of a felt lemon slice. You can tell that these are fish & chips from a restaurant rather than the chip shop because:

  1. The fish has a head
  2.  you only get four chips
  3.  the chips are huge

🙂

fish-and-chip-crochet-brooch-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Argyle colour pooling

Finally I have achieved colour pooling! In the end I had to order a specific yarn (Red Heart Super Saver – Sunrise) which I’m sure cost about 3x as much as it would if it were stocked in any shops in the UK. But I looked everywhere – all the shops that sell yarn near me (and near a few other people too) and there’s plenty of self striping yarn but nothing that would pool into argyle.

The colour change in the yarn itself is very simple – quite a long length of red (purple fading through red to orange) then a short section of yellow, green, blue and that’s it – rinse and repeat.

It still took quite a few attempts to get it to work – moss stitch was the key I think – and even now it’s not just mindless crochet – you have to constantly adjust tension to make sure things line up as they should with the rows below. I’m not sure what I’ll make of this in the end – maybe a shopping bag.

img_20170130_131839

 

Pizza slice brooch

This is my favourite brooch so far. If no one buys it then I’ll happily wear it myself instead.

pizza-crochet-brooch-5

The crocheting for this was done in the same tightly packed way as for the oyster shell. It doesn’t need to hold a 3D shape like the shell but it’s good to have a solid and robust feel to the fabric. The toppings were great fun to come up with and I’m very happy with the combination of crochet thread applique mushroom, beads and button. In my mind the button is a slice of pepperoni and the green seed beads are basil because that’s my favourite topping combo but if you fancy a veggie-tastic pizza slice then the button could easily be a slice of tomato and the beads could be peas. I’ve eaten a lot of pizzas but I’ve never had peas as a topping. I think they’d work though – if sweetcorn is good then why not peas :)

Experiments with colour

I so want to have a go at colour pooling. I’d really like an argyle pattern but anything would be great. I routed around in my stash to find some variegated yarn to give it a go and the only one that looked suitable was this rainbow yarn. The rest was in too long sections and would only ever make horizontal stripes.

crochet-colour-experiments-8

So I followed the various instructions I found, pulled out a length of yarn and looked for repeats in the colour changes:

crochet-colour-experiments-9

So far, so good. I then chained for one colour repeat and then single crocheted back and forth a few times. Then I counted how many single crochets took up one colour repeat. 30. so I chained that many and held on to my excitement for the wonderful patterns that were about to appear….

…except they didn’t. It just looked blobby and horrible. So I tried one SC fewer on the next row. Still just a mess. many more stitch counts later and I had this:

crochet-colour-experiments-6

You can see here that 16 SC is exactly one half of a colour repeat because perfectly lined up you have 3 pinks, then the next row it’s 2 blues and a yellow, three pinks again, etc. all exactly aligned. This should mean that 32 stitches is exactly one colour repeat rather than the 30 I counted initially. You don’t want the exact colour repeat otherwise you just see vertical stripes as in the 16 SC patch above so I tried 31 SC:

crochet-colour-experiments-7

hmmm, some vague diagonals that are not really anything to write home about. I wondered if it was the yarn or just me doing something wrong and took to the internet where I found this great guide from The Crochet Crowd. Here they say that yarns with short colour changes won’t work. coloured lengths should ideally be between 6 and 12 inches. In this yarn the lengths are 1 to 3 inches. doh! At the bottom of this other great pooling tutorial from Glamour 4 U there is a list of yarns that they say will work so I think I’ll order one of those and give it another try.

So then I moved on to what I should do with this rainbow yarn – it looks patchy and awful in SC from these few blocks I’ve made so I needed something else. I remembered reading somewhere that a good trick to harmonise variegated yarn was to use two different types together. Counter intuitive but I thought I’d give it a go with some of the long colour change balls I had. First up was a blue and apricot sock yarn:

crochet-colour-experiments-5

Which did improve the rainbow stuff quite substantially. The slowly changing flecks of peach and blue did have a calming effect on the jarring jumpiness of the rainbow:

crochet-colour-experiments-4

Next I tried something similar to the rainbow but with much longer and gradual changes:

crochet-colour-experiments-3

I needed a 10mm hook to crochet these two together but it did have the advantage that it worked up quickly. And it turn out beautiful!

crochet-colour-experiments-2

So I kept going. I went for one whole repeat of the longer colour changing yarn and then a little more so that the pink was mirrored at each end:

crochet-colour-experiments-11

crochet-colour-experiments-1

Oyster shell brooch

oyster-crochet-brooch-5

This is the improved version of my shell brooch from last week. It is smaller and sits properly when attached to a lapel. I used a very small hook in order to create a thick and sturdy fabric that will hold a 3D shape. It makes your hands ache but is worth it. I created uneven rings of brown, then purple, then beige. I then surface crocheted rings in contrasting cotton and metallic thread and finally added the cluster of glass beads and a drilled pearl. The back is a separate brown piece of crochet to form the outer shell and has a safety pin attachment (I’ve tried various brooch backs and they are either fiddly to operate or not very secure – safety pins are brilliantly perfect for the job). I didn’t use a pattern and just went with the flow to get the feel I had in my mind.

oyster-crochet-brooch-6

If you want to try making one then my main advice would be to use a hook at least half the size that is recommended on the yarn, crochet tightly and practice crocheting around the safety pin. If all that sounds like too much hard work then you’re in luck as I decided to open an Etsy shop to sell some of the things I make. I’ve also put a few other brooches on there that I’ve been beavering away at and will blog about them soon.

oyster-crochet-brooch-10

 

fun & colourful fingerless gloves

I can’t draw wearing gloves, not anything recognisable anyway. But I also can’t draw with freezing cold fingers. It’s a struggle just to keep hold of the pencil when your fingers go numb! So since I’m heading out for some urban sketching in London this weekend I needed to come up with a solution. These fingerless gloves are not going to solve all my woes – fingertips are still exposed – but they’ll definitely help.

fingerless-gloves-with-surface-detail-8

I made these using fair isle effect yarn from Sirdar. I don’t know how much like fair isle these actually look – pretty much just stripy – but the colours are nice and the yarn is soft and good to work with.

img_20170113_205852

I based these on my own pattern that I wrote many years ago but was feeling lazy so took a few shortcuts with the cuff. This does show and they would have been better fitting had I followed the pattern properly. For some extra colour and fun I added a few stripes of different yarn in surface crochet, which I’m liking more and more every time I try it. Quick and effective.

fingerless-gloves-with-surface-detail-2fingerless-gloves-with-surface-detail-1fingerless-gloves-with-surface-detail-8

Lemon sorbet coaster

This is a variation on the grit stitch placemat and coaster pattern using some Rowan creative linen and Sirdar Snuggly Bubbly that I found in a sale.

I chained 16 for the starting row and completed 12 rows for a square coaster. Then instead of SC all around the edge in the same yarn, I fastened off and used a yarn needle to sew an edging with the bubbly yarn – the gaps between the bubbles were too short to get the effect I wanted by crocheting.

lemon-sorbet-coaster-1

lemon-sorbet-coaster-2

Clamshell crochet brooch

I had an idea for a crocheted shell as a brooch with surface details, beads and a real pearl. This is the result. I didn’t have any starting point or pattern – just went with the flow. It felt much more like sculpture than crochet – definitely satisfied my creative itch.

clamshell-crochet-brooch-4

It’s not very practical to wear though as it is a little bulky and the position of the pin means that it tilts down when attached to a lapel. I’m going to take all that on board and make another.

diamond stitch baby blanket

baby-blanket-detail

baby-blanket

I used this diamond crochet stitch diagram to create the main body of the blanket. 3 balls of 50g baby soft green yarn (you can just make out the telling stripes that show I didn’t pay enough attention to dye lots!) then added stripes down one side in pink, blue, dark green, white, dark green and finally blue. The final row is a polka dot edging stitch I read somewhere, half forgot and then made up again until it looked right:

*sc next 4 stitches, chain 4, 10 sc into 3rd chain from hook* repeat to end of row

granny square

Recently I realised that in my ~6 years of crocheting I have never made a granny square. Or a granny anything. I decided to put that right. I even had to look up how to make a granny square because I had no idea. Very easy as it turns out and quite satisfying – I can see why they’re so popular. So, here is my very first granny square! I think I will continue to make it bigger until I get bored and then figure out something to do with it.

granny-square

lace spiral coaster

I’ve seen many different instructions for this kind of spiral pattern and I tried a few but they didn’t seem to work out properly so I started from scratch and came up with my own method that produces a nice flat piece of work. I used crochet thread and a 2.5mm hook but there’s no reason you can’t scale it up.

This pattern is written using American crochet terms but there’s just the one stitch so if you prefer English terms then simply dc throughout.

spiral_coaster_crochet_neschof

 

Round 1: create a magic ring with 6sc and slip stitch closed.

Round 2: *chain 3 and sc into the next stitch* six times to take you all around the circle. you should have created 6 loops.

Round 3: *1sc into the next loop, chain 3 and then sc between the next two loops* six times to take you all around the circle.

Round 4: sc into the next stitch *2sc into the next loop, chain 3, skip the next stitch and sc into the next stitch* repeat between the *stars* six times to take you all around the circle.

Round 5: *sc each stitch to take you to the next loop (this will be 2 sc on round 5, 3 sc on round 6 etc), 2sc into the next loop, chain 3, skip the next stitch and sc into the next stitch* repeat between the stars six times to take you all around the circle.

Repeat round 5 until the piece is as big as you would like. you don’t need to keep track of rounds – once you get the hang of the pattern this is really easy and you can just keep going in a spiral without having to count stitches or keep track of where you are. just carry on until the work is the size you would like.

Last round: sc each stitch and 5 sc into each loop. slip stitch the last few stitches, fasten off and weave in ends.

block or press if needed.


Pay what you feel

If you liked this pattern and want to contribute to my wool stash so I can make bigger and better things then you can donate whatever amount you think this pattern is worth here. To donate more than £1 just increase the number of items 😉 Thank you!

£1.00


Copyright & Legal Stuff: I’m happy for you to sell items you make from this pattern but the images and words are mine – I worked hard writing & testing & photographing so don’t copy or distribute any part of this pattern. If you want to share it then link to this page. Thanks & happy crocheting


 

crochet leaves baby blanket

Another baby on the way. I guess I’m just at that age where all my friends are starting or growing their families. Lots of opportunities for crochet :) 

crochet-leaves-baby-blanket-2

crochet-leaves-baby-blanket-6

I based this blanket on a leaves crochet stitch from mypicot.com I found the instructions a little confusing at first but quickly got into a rhythm and didn’t need to keep checking the pattern after the first repeat. I did need to keep unravelling it when I got distracted and forgot to start new leaves on the correct row. That happened quite a few times…

It worked up fairly fast so I also had time to carve a leaf from lino and create a matching card and tag. I tried using acrylic paint with the roller rather than ink pads but it wasn’t a great success – the paint didn’t go on or come off the lino very easily or smoothly. I think I’ll stick to ink pads for now.

Rainbow unicorn

Look at those eyes… he’s definitely a badass. Or maybe squinting at the sun.

ninja-unicorn-crochet-pattern

What you’ll need:

  • white yarn
  • a small amount of pink yarn
  • small scraps of various/rainbow coloured yarn
  • silver crochet cotton or embroidery floss
  • suitable sized hooks for the yarns and cotton used
  • yarn needle
  • regular needle
  • black thread

This pattern is written using American crochet terms. Gauge is not important – he’ll just be slightly bigger or smaller depending on the hook and yarn used. I used a 4.5mm hook and the finished unicorn is about 20cm tall. Crochet into the back loop only of all stitches unless the instructions say otherwise and continue working in a spiral, using a stitch marker to keep track of rounds. I’m left handed and so the diagram for the legs is also left handed. You’ll need to reverse the direction if you’re right handed (ie. anti-clockwise).

The basic form of this pattern is based on my one piece giraffe pattern so some of the initial photos show orange and brown yarn but the process is the same.

HEAD

Round 1. With white yarn create a magic ring containing 6sc.

Round 2. 2sc into each stitch (12 stitches total)

Round 3. *2sc into first stitch, 1sc in next stitch. *repeat 6 times (18 stitches total)

Round 4. *2sc into first stitch, 1sc in each of next 2 stitches. *repeat 6 times (24 stitches total)

Round 5. 1sc in each stitch.

Round 6. *miss 1 stitch, 1sc in each of next 3 stitches. *repeat 6 times (18 stitches total)

Round 7. *miss 1 stitch, 1sc in each of next 2 stitches. *repeat 6 times (12 stitches total)

STUFF. Do not fasten off but continue with neck

˜
˜it should look like this but in white yarn

NECK

Round 8-11. 1sc in each stitch.

STUFF

Round 12. *2sc into first stitch, 1sc in next stitch. *repeat 6 times (18 stitches total)

Round 13-14. 1sc in each stitch.

Round 15. *2sc into first stitch, 1sc in each of next 2 stitches. *repeat 6 times (24 stitches total)

Round 16. sc 9 stitches, hdc, 2dc, 2dc, 2dc, 2dc, hdc, sc 9 stitches (28 stitches total)

Round 17. sc 9 stitches, hdc, dc, 2dc, dc, 2dc, dc, 2dc, dc, 2dc, hdc, sc 9 stitches (32 stitches total)

˜
˜yours will be white and with a shorter neck

Round 18. sc 10 stitches, hdc, hdc, dc, dc, 2dc, 2dc, 2dc, 2dc, dc, dc, hdc, hdc, sc 10 stitches (36 stitches total)

Round 19-22. 1sc in each stitch.

Do not fasten off but continue with legs:

LEGS

Round 1. The next stitch you are about to complete is stitch number one and there are 36 stitches in the round (see the diagram below)

sc 9 stitches, chain 9, sc back into stitch number one to create a loop. Continue in the direction you are going:

Round 2-5. 1sc in each stitch.

Round 6. Change colour to pink. 1sc in each stitch.

Round 7. *miss 1 stitch, 1sc in each of next 3 stitches. *repeat until there are only a few stitches left, slip stitch the hole closed and fasten off.

˜
˜again, this will be white and pink with a short neck

With white yarn start at stitch 10 (on the diagram – the next stitch from the leg you just completed) and repeat steps 1 to 7 for the second leg.

˜
˜white and pink!

Repeat for the remaining two legs, starting at stitch 19 and 28 respectively.

Stuff the legs and the body

˜
˜final photo from the giraffe pattern

Using white yarn stitch the legs together.

body
Hurray finally a pic showing white and pink!

NOSE

Round 1. With pink yarn create a magic ring containing 6sc.

Round 2. 2sc into each stitch (12 stitches total)

Round 3-5. 1sc in each stitch.

STUFF and sew onto front of head

nose

MANE & TAIL

Attach short lengths of multi-coloured yarn as shown in the photos below and trim as desired. I tried many different methods for the tail – spiky, knotted, plaited – but they didn’t quite look right. Eventually I just went for fairly long with one strand wound around like a hairband to keep it neat.

HORN

Round 1. With silver crochet cotton and a suitable sized hook chain 8 and slip stitch into the first chain.

Round 2-3. 1sc in each chain around (8 stitches)

*Skip one stitch, sc in next 3 stitches* 4 times

*Skip one stitch, sc in next stitch* until no stitches left. Fasten off and trim

Sew onto centre of head

EARS

Attach white yarn to one side of the head and complete 3sc into 3 stiches in the head in a line at right angles to the mane.

Turn, skip 1sc, sc into next 2 stitches.

Turn, skip 1sc, sc into the remaining stich. Fasten off and trim.

Repeat on the other side of the head, mirroring the direction of the first ear

FINISHING

Using black thread sew eyes (slightly downward sloping lines for a ninja expression) and two patches on the nose for nostrils. Weave in any loose ends and give him a name fit for a rainbow unicorn. I went with Tim :)

ninja-unicorn-crochet-pattern


Copyright & Legal Stuff: I’m happy for you to sell items you make from this pattern but the images and words are mine – I worked hard writing & testing & photographing so don’t copy or distribute any part of this pattern. If you want to share it then link to this page. Thanks & happy crocheting

grit stitch placemat & coaster set

 

This crochet stitch is nice and thick with an interesting texture to look at. It’s very easy and only uses sc and dc stitches but looks much more complex than a simple sc or dc all throughout.

This pattern uses American crochet terms. For English terms replace sc with dc and dc with tr and you’re all set.

Any dk weight yarn and a 4mm hook should work for the stitch numbers given in the pattern. The yarn I used was a thin grey recycled cotton so I doubled it up to make it ~dk/worsted. If you’re using a different thickness, a different sized hook and / or you crochet particularly loose or tightly then you may need to adjust the number of stitches and rows to get the size you want.

Placemat

row 1. Chain 53

{for different sized projects you can chain any even number + 3. The even numbered chain will be a good approximation to the finished size}

row 2. dc in 3rd chain from hook, *skip one stitch, 1sc and 1dc into the next stitch*

* repeat across the row until there are only 2 stitches left and end with 1sc in the last stitch of the row.

row 3. chain 2, turn, dc into the sc at the end of the last row (the 3rd chain/stitch from the hook), *skip one stitch, 1sc and 1dc into the next stitch*

* repeat across the row until there are only 2 stitches left and end with 1sc in the last stitch of the row.

Repeat row 3 until the piece is as big as you would like the placemat – I completed 30 rows in total.

Do not fasten off but turn the work 90 degrees and continue in the direction you are going – sc all around the edge with 3sc in each corner. Fasten off and weave in ends.

Coaster

Follow the same instructions as for the placemat but to begin chain 17 and I completed 12 rows but you should add or subtract a few to make them square. Finish by sc-ing all around the edge with 3sc in each corner as for the placemat.

Blocking will make them more square if you want that but I never bothered and think they look fine as is.


Pay what you feel

If you liked this pattern and want to contribute to my wool stash so I can make bigger and better things then you can donate whatever amount you think this pattern is worth here. To donate more than £1 just increase the number of items 😉 Thank you!

£1.00


some people have been saying in the comments that they’re having trouble and seem to be losing stitches between rows. Here are some step by step photos of a small piece starting with a chain of 11 (i.e. 8 + 3):

dc in the 3rd chain from the hook

grit_stitch (5)grit_stitch (1)

now skip one chain and complete 1sc and 1dc in the next chain:

grit_stitch (2)grit_stitch (2) ALT

continue in this way to the end of the row until there are only two chains left. skip one chain and complete a single sc in the last chain of the row (in green below):

grit_stitch (3)

row complete:

grit_stitch (4)

to start the next row, chain 2, turn and then dc into the final sc of the previous row. Then continue as normal (skip one stitch, sc then dc in the next stitch) until there are only two stitches left. Again, just a single sc in the final stitch (green) completes the row:

grit_stitch (7)

grit_stitch (8)


crochet-placemat-6


Copyright & Legal Stuff: I’m happy for you to sell items you make from this pattern but the images and words are mine – I worked hard writing & testing & photographing so don’t copy or distribute any part of this pattern. If you want to share it then link to this page. Thanks & happy crocheting


 

crochet cactus pin cushion

 

crochet cactus pin cushion (62)

you will need:

for the cactus stem and arm

  • green yarn – worsted or chunky
  • 4mm, 4.5mm or 5mm hook suitable for your chosen green yarn (it’s best to use a slightly smaller hook than the yarn suggests so you get a tight structure that is stable and does not show stuffing through the gaps. A smaller hook is harder work though as the stitches will be tight – I’ll leave it to you to decide!)
  • soft stuffing (I used old yarn off-cuts…)

for the base

  • heavy stuffing (I used dried lentils)
  • small amount of brown material
  • a small plant pot (plus paint etc. if you want to decorate the pot)
  • needle and thread

for the flower

  • small scrap of pink yarn and yellow yarn or thread for sewing onto the cactus
  • hook of a size suitable for the pink yarn
  • needle / yarn needle

or for the alternative / realistic flower option:

  • 2mm hook
  • pink, yellow and white thread
  • needle

techniques / stitches used:

All crochet terms and abbreviations are as defined by the Craft Yarn Council. American names for stitches are used so be aware of that if you’re used to another system.

  • magic circle (can be substituted by chain 4, slip stitch into first chain and complete required number of stitches into the loop. this does leave a small hole that the stuffing will show through though so the magic circle is preferred)
  • ch – chain
  • sl st – slip stitch
  • sc – single crochet
  • hdc – half double crochet
  • db – double crochet
  • FPsc – front post single crochet
  • BPsc – back post single crochet

cactus stemcrochet cactus pin cushion (19)

  • rnd1. magic circle with 6sc. sl st to 1st sc (6)
  • rnd2. 2sc in each stitch (12)
  • rnd3 & 4. 1sc in each stitch (12)
  • rnd5. [FPsc, BPsc] x 6 (12)  for the first few rounds this might be tricky and a bit tight but stick with it and soon you will see the ridges appear. It is best to work with the outside of the work facing you – this may need you to turn it inside out after round 4. Once you’ve completed a few rounds then it is simple to just FPsc into every FPsc and BPsc into every BPsc. stuff firmly as you go.
  • repeat rnd5 until stem is ~10cm long, fasten off.

cactus armcrochet cactus pin cushion (35)

  • rnd1. magic circle with 6sc. sl st to 1st sc (6)
  • rnd2. 2sc in each stitch (12)
  • rnd3 & 4. 1sc in each stitch (12)
  • rnd5. [FPsc, BPsc] x 6 (12)
  • repeat rnd5 until arm is ~5cm long. stuff firmly as you go.
  • [3sl st, sc, 2hdc, 3dc, 2hdc, sc] x 2 (12)
  • 1sc each stitch (12), fasten off.

flowercrochet cactus pin cushion (34)

  • rnd1. magic circle with 6sc. sl st to 1st sc (6)
  • rnd2.  [sl st, ch3, sl st same stitch] x 6 (6 petals), fasten off

alternative / realistic flowercrochet cactus pin cushion (23)

 

  • rnd1. in yellow. magic circle with 6sc. sl st to 1st sc (6)
  • rnd2. [2sc, sc] x 3 (9)
  • rnd3. change to pink. sc each stitch (9)
  • rnd4. sc, [ch6, sc] x 9 (9 loops)
  • rnd5. [3sc into next loop, ch3, 3sc into same loop] x 9 (9 loops).
  • fasten off. your flower should look like the photo to the right:crochet cactus pin cushion (29)
  • attach white thread into any of the ch-3 petal tips.
  • rnd6. [ch1, sc into next ch-3 petal tip] x 9
  • fasten off.

base

cut a rough circle of brown fabric 2 to 3 diameters larger than your pot and loosely sew all around the edge:

pull on the two ends of thread to gather the fabric into a pouch, loosely stuff, pull the thread tightly and sew through a few times to secure. (important! only fill the base ~75% with your heavy stuffing material. it should be like a tiny bean bag. The extra space allows the base to be molded so the cactus can be free standing and does not tip over).

crochet cactus pin cushion (16)

decorate your plant pot in any way you choose:

crochet cactus pin cushion (53)

Sew together all the components, covering the base open end with the cactus stem, place into the plant pot and stick with pins. The flexible base allows the cactus to be free standing or sit in the pot and act as a lid – you can fill the pot with other sewing bits and bobs such as safety pins, a tape measure, etc.


Pay what you feel

If you liked this pattern and want to contribute to my wool stash so I can make bigger and better things then you can donate whatever amount you think this pattern is worth here. To donate more than £1 just increase the number of items 😉 Thank you!

£1.00


crochet cactus pin cushion (2)crochet cactus pin cushion (5)crochet cactus pin cushion (1)crochet cactus pin cushion (31)


Copyright & Legal Stuff: I’m happy for you to sell items you make from this pattern but the images and words are mine – I worked hard writing & testing & photographing so don’t copy or distribute any part of this pattern. If you want to share it then link to this page. Thanks & happy crocheting

Peach sherbet crochet hat

Finally, this one is for me! It’s not the perfect hat vision I fuzzily held on to during the previous 4 hats but I like it. This one was made top down in a continuous hdc spiral with a big 6.5mm hook and two strands (peach + cream thick n thin) held together. It worked up fast and I added a huge multicoloured pom pom to the top.

img_20161211_093003

striking hat

Another hat for my ever growing gift pile. I think I am on a futile search for the perfect hat. At the start of making a hat the possibilities are endless and I can imagine a wonderful, brilliant hat. But the image is fuzzy – if I knew exactly what the perfect hat looked like then I could just make it. and as the hat grows in size it also seems to grow further and futher from that perfect yet fuzzy vision. Perhaps the perfect hat design doesn’t exist. perhaps I’m just very fussy. and fuzzy (minded).

This hat was made from the bottom up – no ribbed band this time – I started with foundation hdc to create a ring to fit around my head and then just continued up in the hdc knit stitch explained in an earlier post, switching between grey and bright yellow.

img_20161211_093102

Earth in space crochet hat

I turned my Earth pom pom into a toddler space hat. If you would like to do the same follow the instructions below for both the hat and the pom pom.

HAT

The hat is very simple and worked from the top down in a continuous spiral. crochet into the back loop only of every stitch unless the instructions say otherwise. American crochet terms are used but only sc and hdc stitches are needed. These translate to dc and htr in English terms. Gauge is not important and you can make this hat to fit anyone.

Round 1. In dark grey, dark blue, dark purple or black create a magic ring containing 6sc.

Round 2. 2sc in each stitch (12 stitches total)

Round 3. * 2sc, 1sc * repeat 6 times (18 stitches total)

Round 4. * 2sc, 1sc, 1sc * repeat 6 times (24 stitches total)

Round 5. * 2hdc, 1hdc, 1hdc, 1hdc * repeat 6 times (30 stitches total)

Round 6. *2hdc, 1hdc, 1hdc, 1hdc, 1hdc * repeat 6 times (36 stitches total)

Continue in this same pattern (round 7 would have 5 single hdc stitches between the increases, round 8 would have 6, etc.) until the circle diameter is the correct size according to this wonderful hat sizing chart from Creating Beautiful Things in Life. I made this to fit a 3-year-old so continued increasing until the circle diameter measured 16cm.

Next and all subsequent rounds. 1hdc each stitch, no need to keep track of rounds, just keep going in a continuous spiral until the hat length matches the size of hat you’re making according to the same chart linked above. Again, I used the “2-5 years” row so made my hat 19cm tall.

Once the hat is long enough sc the next stitch, slip stitch the next 2 stitches then fasten off and weave in the ends.

In white, sew a few stars to one side of the hat, as shown in the photo.

POM POM

Either with a pom pom maker or just circles of cardboard create an Earth pom pom as shown in the diagram below. First wind white yarn around the four ends of the maker or in two opposite blobs if you have a cardboard ring. Next wind some uneven green shapes to form continents and then finally wind blue around all the middle but don’t cover the white poles. Cut open, tie off and trim then use the tails to attach to the crown of the hat.

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This is a free pattern & you can sell any items you make from it – I wish you huge success. It is not required but you would make me very happy if you included a link to this pattern in any blog posts / item listings / etc. Writing and testing a crochet pattern is hard work and I retain copyright of the images and the written pattern so please do not copy or distribute any part of this pattern and do not use these images in your listings – use only images of the actual items you create. Thank you and happy crocheting.

crochet coffee cup cozy – hdc knit stitch

A little crocheted sleeve for this recently acquired coffee cup is the perfect size of project to try out new stitches. Today is the “knit” stitch, or I’ve also seen it called the stockinette stitch, both because it looks a lot like knitting I guess. It’s just regular and easy crochet though, based on the hdc stitch.

To start, chain a length that is snug but not overly stretched around the centre of the cup. slip stitch to the first chain and then complete one entire round of a normal hdc in each chain. The number of starting chains will depend on your hook size and the cup – for this cup and my 4mm hook I needed 37 stitches.

Now, on the second round we will start the hdc knit stitch. We’re working in a continuous spiral with no real need to keep track of rounds. So, once you’re up and running, just keep going – no slip stitches or chains to start and end rounds.


The hdc “knit” stitch

When you look at a hdc stitch you see the familiar pair of yarn strands at the top of the stitch (highlighted in red below). To complete a normal hdc stitch you would put the hook under both these stitches.

 

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right handed

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left handed

 

With the right side of the work towards you, if you tilt the stitch forwards then you will see that behind those two yarn strands there is a third strand (shown in green below).

Right handed:

Left handed:

That’s where your hook is going under for the knit stitch. Putting your hook under this third loop at the back causes the two normal strands of the stitch to tilt outwards 90 degrees, creating the knitted look.


So just put your hook under that third stitch each time, go around and around until you think the cozy is tall enough for your cup (8 rounds for me – you can see the 7 lines of knit stitch and then the final taller round in the photos). To finish, sc the next stitch (still into the third loop), slip stitch the next 2 stitches and fasten off. weave in ends and you’re done.

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The orange version was made in exactly the same way except that the first three rounds were done in knit hdc, then one round of regular hdc then back to knit hdc for the final four rounds.img_20161207_171026


This is a free pattern & you can sell any items you make from it – I wish you huge success. It is not required but you would make me very happy if you included a link to this pattern in any blog posts / item listings / etc. Writing and testing a crochet pattern is hard work and I retain copyright of the images and the written pattern so please do not copy or distribute any part of this pattern and do not use these images in your listings – use only images of the actual items you create. Thank you and happy crocheting.

frosty hat (colourful hat v2)

Version 2 of the colourful hat turned out to be not so colourful. I realised about two thirds through that this was going to turn out a bit too small for me. Instead of unravelling I finished it and I know a small someone I can give it to for Christmas. I had planned on using the fluorescent yellow pom pom for this hat but instead went with something more likely to be liked by the recipient. I have vague plans for a v3 for myself using the yellow pom pom. I’m going to stick with this stitch – a variation on hdc – very squashy and stretchy and no classic crochet gaps.

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I also like how neat and tidy the inside of the hat turned out:

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